Ithaca The Canon
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When you start on the way to Ithaca,
wish that the way be long,
full of adventure, full of knowledge.
The Laestrygones and the Cyclopes
and angry Poseidon, do not fear:
such, on your way, you shall never meet
if your thoughts are lofty, if a noble
emotion touch your mind, your body.
The Laestrygones and the Cyclopes
and angry Poseidon you shall not meet
if you carry them not in your soul,
if your soul sets them not up before you.
 
Wish that the way be long,
that on many summer mornings,
with great pleasure, great delight,
you enter harbours for the first time seen;
that you stop at Phoenician marts,
and procure the goodly merchandise,
mother-of-pearl and corals, amber and ebony,
and sensual perfumes of all kinds,
plenty of sensual perfumes especially;
to wend your way to many Egyptian cities,
to learn and yet to learn from the wise.
 
Ever keep Ithaca in your mind,
your return thither is your goal.
But do not hasten at all your voyage,
better that it last for many years;
And full of years at lenght you anchor at your isle
rich with all that you gained on the way;
do not expect Ithaca to give you riches.
 
Ithaca gave you your fair voyage.
Without her you would not have ventured on the way.
But she has no more to give you.
 
And if you find Ithaca a poor place,
     she has not mocked you.
You have become so wise, so full of experience
that you should understand already what
     these Ithacas mean.

Translated by George Valassopoulo

(Translated by George Valassopoulo. The Criterion 2/8, July 1924)

- Original Greek Poem

- Translation by Edmund Keeley/Philip Sherrard

- Translation by John Cavafy

- Translation by Daniel Mendelsohn

- Translation by Stratis Haviaras